Iron Studies
 

Transferrin Saturation

 
 
Bookmark

Overview

  • The transferrin saturation (TSat) is the percentage of transferrin that is bound to iron. This is a more accurate measure of total body iron than the serum iron concentration, which fluctuates significantly.
      • Normal Range

      • Males: 15 - 45%
      • Females: 15 - 55%

Elevated Transferrin Saturation

  • High transferrin saturation is an indicator of iron overload.
    • Causes of Elevated Transferrin Saturation

    • Acute iron intake
    • Iron overload

Reduced Transferrin Saturation

  • Reduced transferrin saturation is a marker of iron deficiency, though can also occur in chronic disease; the ferritin is unlikely to be reduced in the latter.
    • Causes of Reduced Transferrin Saturation

    • Iron deficiency
    • Chronic disease - infection, inflammation, malignancy
Last updated on April 30th, 2020
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Want more info like this?
  • Your electronic clinical medicine handbook
  • Guides to help pass your exams
  • Tools every medical student needs
  • Quick diagrams to have the answers, fast
  • Quizzes to test your knowledge
Explore
   
 
 

Read More...

 Andres E, Serraj K, Zhu J, Vermorken AJ. The pathophysiology of elevated vitamin B12 in clinical practice. QJM: An International Journal of Medicine. 2013 Jun 1;106(6):505-15. Baik HW, Russell RM. Vitamin B12 deficiency in the elderly. Annu Rev Nutr. 1999;19:357-377. Benz Jr EJ. Iron Loading Anaemia. eLS. Brugnara C. Iron Deficiency and Erythropoiesis: New Diagnostic Approaches. Clinical Chemistry. 2003; 49(10): 1573-1578. Cook JD, Flowers CH, Skikne BS. The quantitative assessment of body iron. Blood. 2003; 101: 3359-3363. Goot K, Hazeldine S, Bentley P, Olynyk J, Crawford D. Elevated serum ferritin: What should GPs know?. Australian family physician. 2012;41(12):945-9. Kelly AU, McSorley ST, Patel P, Talwar D. Interpreting iron studies. BMJ: British Medical Journal. 2017 Jun 15;357. Lieu PT, Heiskala M, Peterson PA, Yang Y. The roles of iron in health and disease. Molecular aspects of medicine. 2001 Feb 1;22(1-2):1-87. Lopez A, Cacoub P, Macdougall IC, Peyrin-Biroulet L. Iron deficiency anaemia. The Lancet. 2016 Feb 27;387(10021):907-16.
Metz J. Appropriate use of tests for folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Australian Prescriber. 1999 Feb 1;22(1):16-8.
Muñoz M, Villar I, García-Erce JA. An update on iron physiology. World journal of gastroenterology: WJG. 2009 Oct 7;15(37):4617.
 Neumann WL, Coss E, Rugge M, Genta RM. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis--pathogenesis, pathology and management. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013;10(9):529-541. Rossi E. Hepcidin-the iron regulatory hormone. Clinical Biochemist Reviews. 2005 Aug;26(3):47. Snow CF. Laboratory diagnosis of vitamin B12 and folate deficiency: a guide for the primary care physician. Archives of internal medicine. 1999 Jun 28;159(12):1289-98. Stabler SP. Vitamin B12 deficiency. New England Journal of Medicine. 2013 Jan 10;368(2):149-60. Stanger O. Physiology of folic acid in health and disease. Current drug metabolism. 2002 Apr 1;3(2):211-23. Van Vranken M. Evaluation of microcytosis. American family physician. 2010 Nov 1;82(9). VanWagner LB, Green RM. Elevated serum ferritin. Jama. 2014 Aug 20;312(7):743-4. Waldvogel-Abramowski S, Waeber G, Gassner C, Buser A, Frey BM, Favrat B, Tissot JD. Physiology of iron metabolism. Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy. 2014;41(3):213-21.
Feedback