Transferrin Saturation | Iron Studies - MedSchool
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The transferrin saturation (TSat) is the percentage of transferrin that is bound to iron. This is a more accurate measure of total body iron than the serum iron concentration, which fluctuates significantly.
 

Transferrin Saturation

 
 
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Overview

  • The transferrin saturation (TSat) is the percentage of transferrin that is bound to iron. This is a more accurate measure of total body iron than the serum iron concentration, which fluctuates significantly.
      • Normal Range

      • Males: 15 - 45%
      • Females: 15 - 55%

Elevated Transferrin Saturation

  • High transferrin saturation is an indicator of iron overload.
    • Causes of Elevated Transferrin Saturation

    • Acute iron intake
    • Iron overload

Reduced Transferrin Saturation

  • Reduced transferrin saturation is a marker of iron deficiency, though can also occur in chronic disease; the ferritin is unlikely to be reduced in the latter.
    • Causes of Reduced Transferrin Saturation

    • Iron deficiency
    • Chronic disease - infection, inflammation, malignancy
Last updated on April 30th, 2020
 
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