AV Reentrant Tachycardia | Tachyarrhythmias - MedSchool
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Tachyarrhythmias
 
 
 
 
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AV reentrant tachycardias occur when an atrial impulse is conducted through an accessory pathway - either retrogradely following AV conduction (orthodromic) or anterogradely (antidromic).
 

AV Reentrant Tachycardia

 
 
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Overview

  • AV reentrant tachycardias occur when an atrial impulse is conducted through an accessory pathway - either retrogradely following AV conduction (orthodromic) or anterogradely (antidromic).
    • Look For

    • Orthodromic AVRT (90%) - regular narrow complex tachycardia with no P waves (hidden in QRS) or P waves after QRS complex. No delta wave will be seen.
    • Antidromic AVRT (10%) - regular broad complex tachycardia (easily mistaken for VT)
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    • Mechanism

    • AVRT requires the presence of a distinct accessory pathway, most commonly in the setting of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
  • In orthodromic AVRT, a premature atrial impulse is conducted by the AV node and then is propagated retrogradely up the abnormal accessory pathway, commencing a re-rentry circuit.
  • In antidromic AVRT, an atrial impulse is conducted by the abnormal accessory pathway and is then propagated retrogradely back through the AV node, commencing a re-entry circuit.
Last updated on December 29th, 2018
 
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